Fire Prevention – Colts Neck Fair http://coltsneckfair.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 19:54:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://coltsneckfair.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Fire Prevention – Colts Neck Fair http://coltsneckfair.com/ 32 32 Northamptonshire fire safety adviser shares what he does on home visit to help prevent emergencies https://coltsneckfair.com/northamptonshire-fire-safety-adviser-shares-what-he-does-on-home-visit-to-help-prevent-emergencies/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 19:26:47 +0000 https://coltsneckfair.com/northamptonshire-fire-safety-adviser-shares-what-he-does-on-home-visit-to-help-prevent-emergencies/ The Northamptonshire Fire and Rescue Service (NFRS) have a prevention team to work on fire prevention, and a large part of the team are the home fire safety advisers who visit people in their own properties. In 2021/22, over 4,000 Home Fire Safety Visits (HFSV) were conducted. About two-thirds of these will have been carried […]]]>

The Northamptonshire Fire and Rescue Service (NFRS) have a prevention team to work on fire prevention, and a large part of the team are the home fire safety advisers who visit people in their own properties.

In 2021/22, over 4,000 Home Fire Safety Visits (HFSV) were conducted. About two-thirds of these will have been carried out by fire crews in their communities, but one-third of these will have been enhanced visits for high-risk customers carried out by home fire safety advisers.

Dave Billing is one of seven such advisors for NFRS and has worked part-time in this role since October 2017. Prior to that, he had a 30-year career as a firefighter.

Dave Billing during a home visit.

Dave will usually visit people who have been referred by a number of agencies including EMAS, social services, family or friends, housing officers or associations, employment agencies or Northamptonshire Police .

An example of a visit

On a recent visit, Dave advised a husband and wife, both of whom were in their late 80s and had been referred to the NFRS by Age UK. One client was unable to see and the other had a hearing impairment.

After showing his ID and being welcomed inside, Dave begins by performing a smoke detector test and observing his response. He then refers to a company that can help install specialized smoke alarms for the hearing impaired.

Dave and his team follow up on referrals from other agencies.

He installs a new battery-operated smoke detector with a lifespan of 10 years instead of the current alarm, which requires new batteries every 12 months. He also checks to see if the carbon monoxide alarm is working and moves it to a more accessible location for the couple.

He also installs a new heat alarm in the kitchen, advising them to regularly check if it’s working by pressing the test/silent button using their canes.

He tells them: “The most important thing I can do to protect someone is to install smoke alarms, because that means you will know in the early stages if there is a fire. This will give you more time to get out.

A typical home visit will involve Dave reviewing the layout of the property and advising on the best escape route.

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The visit seemed very well received by the elderly owners, who said they would donate to The Fire Fighters Charity in return for the free help.

He also notes the contact details of a friend of the couple, a 90-year-old woman, who asked if NFRS would visit her as well. This will be added to the spreadsheet to ensure she also receives an HFSV, either from safety advisors or a local fire crew.

It is not only visits to the elderly or vulnerable that the home fire safety team will carry out. They may also conduct visits alongside the Arson Task Force for people whose property may be deemed to be at risk of arson. This may include installing security devices such as a mailbox lock to make it more difficult to break in and enter, or spilling flammable liquids into the mailbox.

“It’s definitely rewarding work, and most importantly, we’re helping to make people safer in their homes,” added Dave.

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Bonhomme Richard’s former captain, chief executive fined $5,000 each in San Diego ship fire, records show https://coltsneckfair.com/bonhomme-richards-former-captain-chief-executive-fined-5000-each-in-san-diego-ship-fire-records-show/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 21:52:26 +0000 https://coltsneckfair.com/bonhomme-richards-former-captain-chief-executive-fined-5000-each-in-san-diego-ship-fire-records-show/ SAN DIEGO- The former commanding officers and executive officers of the amphibious assault ship Bonhomme Richard have each been fined $5,000 as punishment for failing to prepare the ship and its crew to fight the July 2020 fire that destroyed the ship, according to records obtained by the Union-Tribune broadcast. The officers – Capt. Gregory […]]]>

The former commanding officers and executive officers of the amphibious assault ship Bonhomme Richard have each been fined $5,000 as punishment for failing to prepare the ship and its crew to fight the July 2020 fire that destroyed the ship, according to records obtained by the Union-Tribune broadcast.

The officers – Capt. Gregory Thoroman, the ship’s former captain, and Capt. David Ray, the executive officer – were among 22 sailors who received administrative action from the service after the fire, the Navy announced in July. .

The officers’ non-judicial sanction records were released last week in response to a freedom of information law request filed by the Union-Tribune. The service released records for only six of the 27 Sailors whose actions before and during the fire were reviewed by Commander, Pacific Fleet, Adm. Samuel Paparo. The Union-Tribune filed an appeal on Friday for the rest of the files.

Records of the six released sailors show that all received written reprimands, with only Thoroman and Ray being fined. Non-judicial punishment records are heavily redacted, with details of specific charges removed and the names of three sailors withheld. The third sailor named is the ship’s former chief of command, Jose Hernandez.

The cases of the six sailors were tried in December – seven months before the Navy announced the results in July. Other sailors subject to the Admiral’s review received letters of instruction or warning. The review focused on the ship’s fire prevention, fire preparedness and response, the Navy said.

The July 2020 fire burned for nearly five days, destroying most of the ship above her waterline. Marine wrecked the ship in 2021.

The Navy determined the fire was deliberately started and charged a young sailor with arson. The sailor was acquitted of the charge before a military court martial in September. He is still on active duty in San Diego, according to a 3rd Fleet spokesperson.

The Navy has also sought to hold San Diego leaders accountable.

The service’s investigation revealed that numerous deficiencies in training and material conditions on board made the 844-foot warship vulnerable to fires. The sailors lacked training and, although they had been able to fight the fire, the fire stations on board lacked equipment and an automated foam system was inoperative when the fire broke out.

His investigation identified three dozen other Navy officials and sailors who bore some responsibility, from crew members to civilian and high-ranking officials overseeing the modernization of the $250 million ship.

Thoroman was reprimanded for failing to “instruct and train staff” on duty section composition and safety precautions, his non-judicial sanctions report says. The fire started on a Sunday morning when the ship was only manned with its weekend service section – about a sixth of the crew.

His reprimand also included an accusation of dereliction of duty since, as captain, he had “absolute responsibility” for the safety and well-being of the ship.

Three of Thoroman’s five non-judicial punishment specifications have been redacted.

Ray was also reprimanded for dereliction of duty, his non-judicial sanctions report says. As executive officer, Navy says he failed to ensure crew understood and followed firefighting safety precautions on ship while under maintenance . He also did not keep command informed of his survivability, the report said.

Two of the four specs against Ray have been redacted.

Hernandez, the command’s chief captain and highest-ranking enlisted sailor on board, was also reprimanded for dereliction of duty because he failed to teach and enforce standards among the crew and “failed by negligence” of adviser Thoroman on the welfare and training of seafarers on board. , says his report.

The other three non-judicial sanction cases involved the ship’s chief engineer, his damage control assistant and a damage control official – all anonymous. The chief was reprimanded for failing to restore two onboard firefighting foam stations as he had been ordered to do a week before the fire, according to his report. These foam stations were not fully operational at the time of the fire and had been falsely approved as functional during maintenance checks three months before the fire, the Navy investigation found.

The former damage control assistant, a commanding officer, was reprimanded for entering the ship on the second day of the fire after Thoroman gave orders not to, the report said. He was also cited for dereliction of duty for failing to train the ship’s emergency team in port and preventing the ship from sustaining damage.

The ship’s chief engineer failed to provide emergency power to the ship and did not properly stow hazardous materials, his non-judicial sanction report says. Seven of the nine Chief Engineer’s Specifications were written by the Navy.

Senior off-ship officers were also administratively sanctioned, the service said in its July announcement. Letters of instruction were sent to Rear Admiral Scott Brown, director of fleet maintenance, Pacific Fleet, and Rear Admiral Eric Ver Hage, commander of the Navy Regional Maintenance Center.

Vice Admiral Richard Brown, who is now retired but was the commander of the Naval Surface Force at the time of the fire, received a letter of censure from Secretary of the Navy Carlos Del Toro.

The service revamped its port firefighting and prevention programs in the two years since the blaze, Vice Admiral Roy Kitchener, commander of San Diego-based naval surface forces, told reporters. journalists in August. Citing confusion during the first hours of the fire, Kitchener said the Navy established a clear chain of command during such incidents. Surface force commanders – one on the west coast and another on the east coast – will now be in charge on the ground during any major fires.

Changes to the fire prevention program for vessels undergoing maintenance and more firefighting resources at Navy docks are also in the workshe said, and ships are holding more firefighting training and drills.

“We’ve fundamentally changed the way we look at firefighting in ports,” Kitchener told reporters. “At all times vigilance is essential.”

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Scalar Performance SCR1 is an all-electric track-ready Toyota GR86 https://coltsneckfair.com/scalar-performance-scr1-is-an-all-electric-track-ready-toyota-gr86/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 22:45:00 +0000 https://coltsneckfair.com/scalar-performance-scr1-is-an-all-electric-track-ready-toyota-gr86/ While it doesn’t look like the automotive world as a whole is going EV-crazy, the leap that various automakers are making is pointing in that direction. With many of them vowing to electrify their queues over the next decade, the definition of consumer vehicles would change. The ongoing change does not only affect people who […]]]>

While it doesn’t look like the automotive world as a whole is going EV-crazy, the leap that various automakers are making is pointing in that direction. With many of them vowing to electrify their queues over the next decade, the definition of consumer vehicles would change.


The ongoing change does not only affect people who drive daily from one place to another. The shift to electrification is also affecting the world of motorsport, in all its forms, to all effects. In fact, there already exists a single-seater motorsport championship for electric cars – Formula E.

Interestingly, a company called Scalar Performance is transforming Toyota GR86 sports cars into all-electric amateur racing cars. That’s pretty surprising, especially because while Toyota intended race-minded people to use the GR86 as a race car, it never intended the believable, flexible sports car to become an electric car.

Yet Scalar Performance defied all odds and managed to convert the GR86 into a prepared track electric amateur touring racing car called SCR1. Scalar Performance indeed unveiled the SCR1 at the 2022 SEMA Show, hoping to draw attention to its new creation.


Scalar Performance’s SCR1 is an electrified Toyota GR86

Scalar Performance never intended the SCR1 to just hit the roads. After all, partners Brian Bourne and Joel Fallaise are both amateur runners looking to create an electric racing car. Their goal was for this race car to provide a purist driving experience, but with minimal maintenance. This should allow the client team to focus on course setup as well as driver development.

With help from partners Hypercraft and Ettractive, Scalar Performance worked to deliver a race car that could compete in the National Auto Sport Association (NASA) Super Touring Series. The SCR1 is therefore the first electric club racing vehicle to receive approval for amateur road racing from NASA.

Although Scalar Performance does not explicitly say the base vehicle of the SCR1, but it is very obvious from the appearance of the race car that it is a Toyota GR86, but in EV form. Although it retained the exterior appearance of a GR86, the SCR1 is a creation of Scalar Performance underneath, with a number of special elements essential to its EV transformation.

RELATED: Toyota files patent for manual electric vehicle

Replacing a conventional engine with an electric powertrain

Scalar Performance SCR1 Cross Section Electric Race Car Powertrain
Via: scalar performance

Scalar Performance had to remove or replace quite a few parts and components from the SCR1 to facilitate its transformation into an EV. For example, Scalar Performance removed the engine and transmission from the GR86 and replaced them with an electric transmission.

Propulsion is provided by an 800-volt Stealth EV motor from Hypercraft, drawing its juice from a custom 65kWh battery that Scalar Performance says is specifically designed for motorsport. This configuration provides approximately 328 hp of continuous power and 345 lb-ft of near-instantaneous torque.

In terms of performance, the SCR1 can zoom from zero to 60 mph in 3.9 seconds, which is a few seconds faster than a GR86. The SCR1 can go as fast as 165 mph. While those numbers aren’t exactly impressive compared to other electric sports cars, Scalar Performance insists they designed the SCR1 for lap times, not spec numbers.

According to the company, the SCR1 has Level 2 and Level 3 DC fast charging capabilities. is good for a race time of more than 45 minutes.

Scalar Performance mounted the electric motor in the rear for a rear-wheel-drive (RWD) configuration, with support for the Ettractive 5.19:1 gear reduction with straight-cut gears as well as the Torsen limited-slip differential (Torque Sensing ).

RELATED: The Toyota bZ3 is the all-electric Camry of the future

Designed for safety with free hardware and software upgrades

Scalar Performance SCR1 electric racing car quarter rear white
Via: scalar performance

To ensure a dynamic driving experience during races, Scalar Performance designed the SCR1 for a motorsport-oriented setup. This way, the SCR1 can offer drivers the feel of a mid-engined race car with a similar weight distribution. Supporting its dynamics is a bespoke suspension from Öhlins as well as a braking system that includes six-piston front calipers and four-piston rear calipers.

Weighing approximately 3,040 pounds, the SCR1 is loaded with a number of security features which enable it to meet or even exceed FIA safety requirements. For example, the SCR1 features thermal management and runaway prevention, as well as a Lifeline fire suppression system with Novec 1230 built into the battery.

Additionally, the SCR1 comes complete with a custom eight-point roll cage (paint to sample) from VR3 Engineering, a Safecraft Racing FIA six-point safety harness, a custom SFI safety racing net and a webbing strap. towing.

Scalar Performance is building a limited run of 10 SCR1s for the first edition. The so-called Founder Edition race cars will hit the track in the summer of 2023. Each limited edition SCR1 Founder comes with a distinct “1 of 10” plaque with the owner’s name engraved on it.

The company will then follow the Founder Edition race cars with Gen2 models. First Edition owners can upgrade their race cars to SCR1 Gen 2 with hardware and/or software upgrades at no additional cost.

Source: scalar performance

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Cause of Evergreen Recycling fire determined https://coltsneckfair.com/cause-of-evergreen-recycling-fire-determined/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 22:33:00 +0000 https://coltsneckfair.com/cause-of-evergreen-recycling-fire-determined/ WICHITA, Kan. (KWCH) – The Sedgwick County Fire Department said it determined the cause of a large fire at a Park City lumber recycling facility was spontaneous combustion. The October 30 fire at Evergreen Recycling burned for several days. “Fire investigators spoke with dozens of people and watched hours of captioned video to determine that […]]]>

WICHITA, Kan. (KWCH) – The Sedgwick County Fire Department said it determined the cause of a large fire at a Park City lumber recycling facility was spontaneous combustion. The October 30 fire at Evergreen Recycling burned for several days.

“Fire investigators spoke with dozens of people and watched hours of captioned video to determine that the fire started at the southeast corner of the northernmost pile of wood debris. “, said the Sedgwick County Fire Department in a press release. “The only cause that could not be ruled out was spontaneous ignition, which occurs when materials with low ignition temperatures (such as wood, wood chips and mulch) heat up and ignite. automatically”

The fire department said firefighters were able to leave the scene permanently on Tuesday, November 8, nine days after the blaze started.

“The owner and employees of Evergreen Recycling played a vital role in helping to control the fire and its eventual extinguishment,” the Sedgwick County Fire Department said.

Evergreen Recycling lost approximately $1 million in raw wood products to the fire. The Sedgwick County Fire Department said it is still compiling information to estimate the cost associated with the fight to extinguish the blaze.

“The (Sedgwick County Fire District 1) Fire Prevention Division will work with Evergreen Recycling to make changes to the size of combustible material piles, fire breaks, water supply and other preventative measures that will help prevent or lessen any future fires more quickly,” the fire department said.

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Two early morning fires in Syracuse, caused by an oven and candles https://coltsneckfair.com/two-early-morning-fires-in-syracuse-caused-by-an-oven-and-candles/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 14:37:28 +0000 https://coltsneckfair.com/two-early-morning-fires-in-syracuse-caused-by-an-oven-and-candles/ SYRACUSE, NY (WSYR-TV) – The Syracuse Fire Department (SFD) responded to two fires early this morning Nov. 4. First light: 4:44 a.m. SFD firefighters were alerted by the 911 Center to a possible fire in the 100 block of Stewart Court in the Pioneer Homes area this morning. Station 1 (S. State St.) firefighters responded. […]]]>

SYRACUSE, NY (WSYR-TV) – The Syracuse Fire Department (SFD) responded to two fires early this morning Nov. 4.

First light: 4:44 a.m.

SFD firefighters were alerted by the 911 Center to a possible fire in the 100 block of Stewart Court in the Pioneer Homes area this morning.

Station 1 (S. State St.) firefighters responded.

They arrived on the scene and found a two-story, brick, multi-occupancy apartment building with smoke coming from the windows.

After the crew forced themselves through the door, they came across smoke that covered the floor to the ceiling. Following this, they extinguished a kitchen fire.

The rest of the two-story apartment was searched. Only one person was in the apartment, and had already evacuated after being alerted by a smoke detector.

This person was checked for smoke inhalation, but came back clean.

According to SFD, Syracuse fire investigators determined that this fire was caused by an oven accidentally left on by the occupant. The fire was successfully brought under control in the kitchen by firefighters. Crews remained on site to evacuate smoke and toxic gases from the structure.

Second light: 6:47 a.m.

After SFD cleared the previous fire at Stewart Court, they were again alerted by the 911 center to another fire on the 300 block of Malverne Drive on the north side.

Firefighters from Station 2 (Lodi Street) arrived at the two-and-a-half-story house with a fire coming out of the second-story windows.

When the crew entered the frame house, they started looking for people. The two people in the house were able to evacuate safely. However, there were no working smoke detectors in the house at the time.

The fire on the second floor was contained within a single chamber.

According to the SFD, before leaving the scene of the fire, the firefighters installed new detectors in the house. There were no injuries and Syracuse fire investigators determined the fire was accidentally started by a candle.

SFD thanks its partners at Center 911, Syracuse Police, AMR and National Grid.

Visit their website or call our fire prevention office at (315)-448-4777 to request free smoke detectors with installation by Syracuse Fire.

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CCFD responds to an early morning fire off Shady Lane https://coltsneckfair.com/ccfd-responds-to-an-early-morning-fire-off-shady-lane/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 02:23:00 +0000 https://coltsneckfair.com/ccfd-responds-to-an-early-morning-fire-off-shady-lane/ The fire was located on the first floor and was able to spread to the second floor, spreading throughout the house. CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas – An Annaville woman awoke to the smell of smoke in her home Tuesday morning after discovering the source of the smell was her hot water heater fire. The fire was […]]]>

The fire was located on the first floor and was able to spread to the second floor, spreading throughout the house.

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas – An Annaville woman awoke to the smell of smoke in her home Tuesday morning after discovering the source of the smell was her hot water heater fire.

The fire was located on the first floor and was able to spread to the second floor, spreading throughout the house.

The woman alerted the authorities and the firefighters were able to put it out in 20 minutes, without causing any injuries.

“A real good example that this can be dangerous fires for these people, they wake up in the middle of the night and they have smoke inside their house,” said CCFD Battalion Chief Jim Devisser. “This lady did the right thing by evacuating the building and calling 911, letting us in and do our thing.”

Although the cause of the fire is still under investigation, there are still things residents can do to make sure the area around your water heater is safe and secure.

“Just general cleanliness, making sure the area around the water heater isn’t cluttered with flammable materials, making sure your electrics and gas — all your utilities are in order,” Devisser said.

He adds that the most important item to have in your home for fire prevention is a smoke alarm. If residents don’t have one, they can call the fire department and have it installed for you.

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FASNY reminds all New Yorkers to inspect their smoke detectors – troyrecord https://coltsneckfair.com/fasny-reminds-all-new-yorkers-to-inspect-their-smoke-detectors-troyrecord/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 12:38:38 +0000 https://coltsneckfair.com/fasny-reminds-all-new-yorkers-to-inspect-their-smoke-detectors-troyrecord/ NEW YORK – As we prepare to reset our clocks on November 6 for the end of DST, the New York State Firefighters Association (FASNY) has urged all New Yorkers to change / check the batteries of their smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors. Alarms with removable batteries must be replaced. Alarms that have sealed […]]]>

NEW YORK – As we prepare to reset our clocks on November 6 for the end of DST, the New York State Firefighters Association (FASNY) has urged all New Yorkers to change / check the batteries of their smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors.

Alarms with removable batteries must be replaced. Alarms that have sealed batteries should make sure they work. Owners should replace any detector over 10 years old.

Working smoke detectors are often the difference between life and death in a home fire. According to the National Fire Prevention Association, the risk of dying in a home without working smoke detectors is 55% higher than in a home with fully functioning alarms. In addition, three out of five home fire deaths occur in homes without working smoke alarms.

New York State enacted legislation in 2019 that required all new smoke alarms to contain 10-year non-removable batteries that discourage tampering. If you are unsure of when you last replaced the batteries or purchased a smoke detector, FASNY encourages you to purchase a new one.

This time of year usually brings an increase in house fires. Currently, New York State has the third highest number of residential fire deaths in the nation with 108 civilians killed, up from 76 at this time last year. New York is slightly behind Texas (113) and Pennsylvania (127).

“The most dangerous time of year for home fires is upon us. All New Yorkers should make sure their smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are working properly,” said FASNY President, Edward Tase Jr.

“We encourage you to replace your fire alarm every ten years and to check your alarm monthly. Help prevent tragedies by protecting your home with smoke detectors on all levels and outside sleeping areas,” Tase Jr. explained.

Smoke alarms provide critical minutes to escape the home in an emergency. Another essential tool is a carbon monoxide detector, which can warn of quiet but deadly gas buildup in the home. As the weather turns colder and snow begins to fall, New Yorkers should perform a home safety check to make sure CO detectors are working properly.

“Smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors are the first line of defense against tragedy,” noted Tase Jr.

“Unfortunately, we find that the majority of fatal fires occur in homes without smoke alarms or in homes where they are not working properly. This Sunday is a great reminder to do a home safety check – check your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors and make sure everyone knows how to get out of the house in case of an emergency,” Tase added. Jr.

Safety tips provided by FASNY and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) include:

• Test alarms at least once a month using the test button.

• If you have a smoke alarm with a removable battery, be sure to check the batteries every six months and change the batteries at least once a year. If a battery begins to lose power, the device will usually beep to alert you. Do not disable the unit.

• Vacuum or blow out any dust that may accumulate inside the unit.

• Never borrow an alarm battery for use elsewhere.

• Never paint a smoke or carbon monoxide alarm.

• Install at least one smoke alarm on every level of your home, including the basement and in or near every bedroom.

• Smoke alarms should not be installed near a window as drafts may interfere with their operation.

• Families should also develop and practice a fire escape plan.

• Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for testing smoke alarms and replacing batteries.

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Publication of analysis of learning facilitated by Marshall Fire https://coltsneckfair.com/publication-of-analysis-of-learning-facilitated-by-marshall-fire/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 03:01:00 +0000 https://coltsneckfair.com/publication-of-analysis-of-learning-facilitated-by-marshall-fire/ The scan is intended as an education and training tool for first responders. BOULDER COUNTY, Colo. – A report released Thursday provides deep insight into the chaotic early hours of the Marshall Fire. The report, known as facilitated learning analytics, was requested by the Mountain View Fire Department, Louisville Fire Department, and Boulder County. It […]]]>

The scan is intended as an education and training tool for first responders.

BOULDER COUNTY, Colo. – A report released Thursday provides deep insight into the chaotic early hours of the Marshall Fire.

The report, known as facilitated learning analytics, was requested by the Mountain View Fire Department, Louisville Fire Department, and Boulder County. It was led by the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control.

> Read the full facilitated learning analysis

The scan is intended to be an education and training tool for first responders, helping those who were directly involved in the response to understand what happened.

The report does not include the cause and origin of the fire, which is still under investigation by the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office.

Two people were killed in the Dec. 30 fire, which was the most destructive in Colorado’s history. The fire burned more than 6,000 acres in Boulder County, destroying 1,091 structures and damaging 179. It caused more than $2 billion in losses, making it by far the costliest fire in Colorado history.

The report details the heroism of first responders, some of whom went door to door on the path to the fire to save residents.

RELATED: Deputy Chief Receives Mountain View Fire Rescue’s First Medal of Bravery for Actions During Marshall Fire

“Thousands of emergency personnel and equipment poured in from neighboring counties, and a local Type 3 team attempted to establish control during the most catastrophic fire in Colorado history,” the report said. report. “Water ran out in some areas, and utility crews went to great lengths to keep the pressure on for firefighters. Propane tanks exploded to the scream of hurricane-force gusts, making the area look like a war zone. The efforts of these responders were nothing short of extraordinary, many working through the night and into the next day. Many local responders had homes within the perimeter of the fire.

RELATED: Water supply in Louisville, Superior nearly ran dry as firefighters battle Marshall Fire blazes

Chaotic communication

The report revealed that there were not enough radio frequencies for all the resources deployed to fight the fire.

The planned communications pattern was already in use for the so-called Middle Fork Fire, which was first reported around 10:30 a.m. that day in the foothills north of Boulder. This fire briefly threatened homes but was brought under control without causing any damage.

This earlier fire response meant Marshall Fire responders had to come up with a different setup on the fly.

RELATED: Some suburbs in the Denver metro area may be vulnerable to wildfires on high-risk days

Crews that came from other places had their own radio systems, and they didn’t always match.

“Rural departments arrived with VHF radios. Municipal departments often only had 800 MHz radios. Law enforcement worked directly with firefighters, but many relied on their home dispatch centers for tracking and information,” the report said.

The report Avista Adventist Hospital was evacuated more quickly because an emergency medical services chief used his home dispatch center in Broomfield County to request resources, rather than going through the mutual aid.

RELATED: Lesson learned by hospitals from Marshall Fire has already been used in other disasters

Wind effects

The report said the extreme drought was a major factor in the initial spread of the fire, noting that the winds that day were not unprecedented.

“Without the impacts of the drought and multiple other environmental factors that set the stage for the fire to ignite and spread, the wind event would have been a non-factor,” the report said.

However, according to the report, the winds were strong enough that if the fire had started sooner or the winds had lasted longer, there would have been even more destruction.

“The spread of the fire was halted in urban areas by a sudden wind shift recorded by line personnel at 12:15 a.m. on December 31, 2021 and by nearby weather stations as having occurred between 11:00 p.m. and 1:00 a.m.,” the report said. report. “This wind shift brought a cooler, more humid air mass as the rotor failed and the upflow enveloped the fire area. Even before this wind shift, responders noted that the The intensity of the winds had subsided, allowing them to begin to put out the fire more effectively. If the Marshall Fire had started earlier in the day, or if the downdraft winds had been sustained throughout the night, the extent of damage would have been greater, as distances between structures do not increase noticeably north and east of the final fire perimeter.”

The wind also made it difficult for the crews to find the fire at first, as there was no clear smoke plume.

“[A firefighter] went to secure his helmet with the chin strap, but by the time it took to move a hand from the top of the dome to the side, the helmet was ripped from his head and sent bouncing across the grass and into the misty smoke “said the report. “He never found him. The flames moved horizontally at a rapid spread rate and the water was ineffective. The front of flames had overtaken them in a garden. [The firefighter] was grateful they used the hose reel so they could retrieve the fully water loaded hose rather than having to abandon it as they repositioned themselves to chase the fire front.”

Spread of fire

The report found that houses were more likely to be destroyed if they caught fire due to indirect exposure than direct exposure. “Indirect exposure” refers to embers or flames from other burning buildings, while “direct exposure” refers to embers or flames from wild fuels.

“Of exposed structures, the most common outcome was no damage in directly exposed structures, occurring at 46.93%, but destruction was the most common outcome in indirectly exposed structures (46%),” according to the report. “Indirectly exposed structures were more likely to destroy than directly exposed ones (46.17% indirect exposure to destruction rate versus 41.27% direct exposure to destruction rate).

RELATED: Marshall Fire Losses Surpass $2 Billion

The report also revealed that wooden fencing played a role in spreading the fire.

“The Sagamore Subdivision and subdivisions along McCaslin Boulevard were directly exposed to some wildfire intensity, oriented spatially in the same direction, and had similar spacing between structures. The Sagamore Subdivision was completely destroyed, while the subdivisions along McCaslin Boulevard were largely untouched. Part of the difference appears to be in the distances between the wild fuels and the wooden fences next to the houses where they existed,” the report states. “Both neighborhoods had wooden fences around many houses on their outskirts, but houses just east of McCaslin Boulevard had a distinct advantage, as a small area (usually 30–50 feet) of manicured lawn lay beside these fences. Small embers associated with spotting wild herbs go out very quickly, with those that land often only being able to ignite small one-hour fuels such as dried herbs. For this reason, combined with the effect that McCaslin Boulevard itself had in slowing, but not stopping, the overall spread of fire, the lower intensity and reduction in staining produced by a small area of natural fuels next to manicured lawns were not sufficient to catch the wood. burning fences and the houses in this area are largely intact. »

From June: Marshall Fire’s after-action report lists dozens of recommendations to help prepare for the next emergency

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]]> CCFR’s Michael Jackson receives Fire Marshal of the Year award https://coltsneckfair.com/ccfrs-michael-jackson-receives-fire-marshal-of-the-year-award/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 23:42:43 +0000 https://coltsneckfair.com/ccfrs-michael-jackson-receives-fire-marshal-of-the-year-award/ The Reflector Michael Jackson, the division chief of Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue, received the 2022 Fire Marshal of the Year award. The award is presented by the Washington State Firefighters Association. CCFR Community Harm Reduction staff nominated Jackson for the award. “Chief Jackson has proven himself to be someone who, through his leadership, education and experience, […]]]>

The Reflector

Michael Jackson, the division chief of Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue, received the 2022 Fire Marshal of the Year award.

The award is presented by the Washington State Firefighters Association.

CCFR Community Harm Reduction staff nominated Jackson for the award.

“Chief Jackson has proven himself to be someone who, through his leadership, education and experience, has provided exemplary service to the citizens of our district and to many residents outside of our borders,” a statement said. Press. “He has expanded the vision of community risk reduction to areas outside the typical fire safety realm and improved services through his exceptional creativity and diligence in conceptualizing and implementing unique programs that serve better our community in injury and fire prevention.”

Jackson was recognized for leading seamless integration with other agencies and partners, for expanding the Community Support Counseling and Education Services program to Southwest Washington, for launching a co -behavioral response and for creating a falls reduction program.

“Division Chief Jackson has taken tremendous steps to advance Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue in the areas of fire prevention and community risk reduction,” Fire Chief John Nohr said in the statement. . “Our communities are safer today because of the work of Chief Jackson.”

Jackson holds a bachelor’s degree in fire and safety engineering technology from Eastern Kentucky University and a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Washington.

“Chief Jackson has proven himself to be an innovator in providing service to his community and continues to find unique ways to reduce life safety risks both for the first responders he works with, as well as for the citizens it serves”, declared the Liberation. “For that, Clark-Cowlitz Fire Rescue couldn’t be more proud of the Washington State Association of Fire Marshal’s 2022 Fire Marshal of the Year, Division Chief Michael Jackson.”

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Livingston County Marks Fire Prevention Month | Lifestyles https://coltsneckfair.com/livingston-county-marks-fire-prevention-month-lifestyles/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 04:10:00 +0000 https://coltsneckfair.com/livingston-county-marks-fire-prevention-month-lifestyles/ GENESEO – Livingston County is proud to celebrate National Fire Prevention Month – an initiative designed to raise awareness and educate the public about the risks of deadly fires and to commemorate those who lost their lives in these tragedies. Founded in 1922 by the National Fire Protection Association, Fire Prevention Month was originally created […]]]>

GENESEO – Livingston County is proud to celebrate National Fire Prevention Month – an initiative designed to raise awareness and educate the public about the risks of deadly fires and to commemorate those who lost their lives in these tragedies.

Founded in 1922 by the National Fire Protection Association, Fire Prevention Month was originally created to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. Today, it focuses on fire safety awareness and fire prevention. education of families, students, and communities across the United States.

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